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Program OverviewFacultyCoursesStudent WorkWriting a PaperLinksEvents

Core Faculty

Norton Batkin
Daniel Berthold (Director)
Jay R. Elliott
Garry L. Hagberg
Robert L. Martin
David Shein
Kritika Yegnashankaran

Affiliated Faculty

Thomas Bartscherer
Roger Berkowitz
James Brudvig
Alan Sussman

Visiting Faculty

Ruth Zisman

Core Faculty

Norton Batkin
Associate Professor of Philosophy and Art History

Norton Batkin

B.A., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Yale University (1981–88); Associate Professor of Humanities, Scripps College (1988–90); Director (1991–94, 2002–05) and Director of the Graduate Program (1994–2007), Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, Bard College. Author of Photography and Philosophy (1990) and articles on photography, the museum and exhibition, the history of formalism, and other philosophical topics, in Seeing Wittgenstein Anew: New Essays on Aspect-Seeing (2010), The Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (1998), and the journals Philosophical Topics, Common Knowledge, Midwest Studies in Philosophy, and The Journal of Aesthetic Education. Art editor, Conjunctions. (1991– ) Vice President and Dean of Graduate Studies; Faculty, Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture; Associate Professor of Philosophy and Art History.

     Professor Batkin has taught courses on aesthetics after Kant and politics, the arts, and democratic culture.

Contact information: batkin@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7895.
Ludlow 302.


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Daniel Berthold (Director)
Professor of Philosophy 

Daniel Berthold (Director)

B.A., summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, M.A., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., Yale University. Specialization in continental philosophy (Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, existentialism, phenomenology), Freud, and applied ethics (bioethics, environmental ethics, medical ethics). Author of Hegel’s Grand Synthesis: A Study of Being, Thought and History; Hegel’s Theory of Madness; and The Ethics of Authorship: Communication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard. Articles and reviews in journals including Clio, Environmental Ethics, History and Theory, History of Philosophy Quarterly, Human Ecology Review, Idealistic Studies, International Philosophical Quarterly, International Studies in Philosophy, Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Ludus Vitalis, Man and World, Metaphilosophy, Modern Language Notes, Noûs, Philosophy and Literature, Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology, Religious Studies, The Review of Metaphysics, Social Theory and Practice, and The Southern Journal of Philosophy. Contributor to The Dictionary of Existentialism. Editorial board, Topoi Library. Academic advisory board member, McGraw-Hill Philosophy Web Resources. Advisory council, The Hastings Center Program in Ethics, Science, and the Environment. (1984– ) Professor of Philosophy.

     Professor Berthold teaches courses in continental philosophy, applied ethics, Freud, feminist philosophy, the philosophy of religion, critical reasoning, and a multicultural introduction to philosophy.

Contact information: berthold@bard.edu. Phone Ext. 7208
Aspinwall 101


For more information download this file: Daniel Berthold photo 2.jpg

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Jay R. Elliott
Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Jay R. Elliott

Jay R. Elliott received his B. A. magna cum laude from NYU in 2000, with honors in Philosophy and Fine Arts. He went on to do graduate work at the University of Chicago, where he received his Ph. D. in Philosophy in 2010. During 2010-12, he was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Yale University. He has also taught philosophy at Iona College and at the New School for Social Research, where he was a Visiting Professor in 2011-12. Professor Elliott’s principal research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of ethical theory, social and political philosophy, and the philosophy of action. He is particularly interested in theories of social injustice and theories of human flourishing. In approaching these themes, his work engages with a variety of philosophical traditions, including ancient and medieval philosophy, contemporary Anglo-American ethics, and critical theory.

     Professor Elliott has presented his work at many venues in the U.S. and Europe, including CUNY Graduate Center, Temple University, Dartmouth College, the University of Lisbon, the University of Potsdam, and the Sorbonne. Among his recent publications are: “The Meaning of Life and the ‘Pottersville Test’”, in Film and Philosophy 17 (2013); and “Platonic Ethical Skepticism”, forthcoming in the International Journal for the Study of Skepticism. He is currently at work on a book entitled Moral Psychology and Character, which provides a critical survey of contemporary philosophical debates about the nature and structure of character traits. He is also co-editor (with James Conant) of the forthcoming Norton Anthology of Western Philosophy, volume 5: The Analytic Tradition.

     Professor Elliott teaches courses in ethical theory, social and political philosophy, ancient philosophy, medieval philosophy, the philosophy of action, and the philosophy of art.

     For more information on Professor Elliott’s research and teaching, visit his personal website at https://sites.google.com/site/jayrussellelliott.

     Contact information: jelliott@bard.edu. Phone Ext. 7280. Aspinwall 109.


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Garry L. Hagberg
James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Aesthetics and Philosophy 

Garry L. Hagberg

B.A. (music, philosophy, psychology), M.A., Ph.D. (philosophy), University of Oregon. Visiting graduate studies, Oxford University; postdoctoral research, Cambridge University. Fellowships from National Endowment for the Humanities; Dartmouth College (in both music and literature); Cambridge University (Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and the Humanities); Institute for the Theory and Criticism of the Visual Arts; British Museum and Library, London; Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, Washington, D.C.; and many others. Author of Describing Ourselves: Wittgenstein and Autobiographical Consciousness (Oxford University Press, 2008); Art as Language: Wittgenstein, Meaning, and Aesthetic Theory (Cornell University Press, 1995); Meaning and Interpretation: Wittgenstein, Henry James and Literary Knowledge (Cornell, 1994); editor of Art and Ethical Criticism (Blackwell, 2008); co-editor of The Blackwell Companion to the Philosophy of Literature (Blackwell, 2009). Author of about 50 articles and 35 reviews, review-essays, and art catalogue essays, with contributions to philosophical journals such as Philosophy, Mind, and Philosophical Quarterly; specialized journals such as The British Journal of Aesthetics, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, Philosophy and Literature, and Ethics; journals in the Wittgensteinian tradition such as Philosophical Investigations and Wittgenstein-Studien; literary journals such as New Literary History, Poetics Today, The Henry James Review, and The New Novel Review; reference works such as The Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, The Encyclopedia of the Essay, The Encyclopedia of Life-Writing, and  The Blackwell Companion to Art Theory; and numerous edited collections. He has delivered invited philosophical papers and talks at conferences and colloquia around the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Europe, and Russia; serves (since 2002) as joint Editor of the journal Philosophy and Literature (based at Bard); serves on the editorial board of The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism and has served the American Society for Aesthetics as National Program Chair, Trustee, guest-editor of its journal (for a special issue on Improvisation in the Arts), and many other offices; serves on the executive committee of The British Society for Aesthetics, Oxford; and has served on numerous doctoral committees (Columbia University, McGill University, Tel Aviv University, others) and supervised masters and doctoral students at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, England, where he held a Chair (while on leave from Bard) in the School of Philosophy 2006-2009. Forthcoming work includes pieces for The Cambridge Companion to Dewey, an edited volume Seeing Wittgenstein Anew, and the edited volume Philosophy as Therapeia from the Royal Institute of Philosophy; work-in-progress includes the co-authored volume Wittgenstein on Music, and a new book on the contribution literary experience makes to the formation of self and sensibility, Living in Words: Literature, Language, and the Constitution of Selfhood. (1990– ) James H. Ottaway Jr. Professor of Philosophy and Aesthetics.

     Professor Hagberg teaches specialized courses on the philosophy of the arts and the history of aesthetic thought; the philosophy of language since 1900; pragmatism; and the development of twentieth-century philosophy, in addition to courses on issues and authors from Plato and Aristotle to the present day.

Contact information: hagberg@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7270.
Aspinwall 110.


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Robert L. Martin
Professor of Philosophy and Music

Robert L. Martin

Robert Martin studied philosophy at Haverford College (B.A., 1961) and Yale University (Ph.D. 1965). He taught in the philosophy departments of the University of Minnesota, State University of New York at Buffalo, Rutgers University (where he was tenured in 1969), University of California (Irvine and Los Angeles campuses), and at Bard College since 1994. His research areas are philosophy of language and philosophy of music. His philosophy publications include two books which he edited and to which he contributed: Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox, Oxford University Press, 1984, and The Paradox of the Liar, Yale University Press, 1970. He published twenty-four articles, chapters and reviews, ranging from "Toward a Solution to the Liar Paradox," in The Philosophical Review 76 in 1967 to "Ontology of Music" in The Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, ed. Michael Kelly (Oxford University Press) in 1998 and a review of Inside Beethoven’s Quartets, by Lewis Lockwood and the Juilliard String Quartet (Harvard Press, 2008) published in Chamber Music in 2008. At UCLA, Martin co-authored (with David Kaplan) logic software (Logic: A Workbook) for the Kalish-Montague natural deduction system; a web-based version of that software has since been written and is used in Martin’s Symbolic Logic course at Bard. (1994– ) Professor of Philosophy and Music.

      Professor Martin teaches courses in logic, the philosophy of music, and analytic philosophy.

      Contact information: martin@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7419.
Bito 101.


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David Shein
Associate Vice President and Dean of Studies,  Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy

David Shein

B.A., State University of New York at Oswego; M.Phil., Graduate Center, City University of New York; Ph.D., Graduate Center, CUNY. Has taught at Lehman College. Areas of interest: realism and antirealism, relativism, metaphysics, and epistemology. Developed Bard’s Academic Services Center and Disability Services. Numerous presentations at professional conferences.  Associate Vice President and Dean of Studies (2005-- ); Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy.

      Professor Shein teaches courses on the philosophy of science, political philosophy, skepticism, and relativism.

      Contact information: shein@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7454.
Sottery 110.


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Kritika Yegnashankaran
Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Kritika Yegnashankaran

B.A. and M.A. in Philosophy, Stanford University. PhD in Philosophy, Harvard University. Areas of specialization: Philosophy of Mind and Moral Philosophy. (2010– ) Assistant Professor of Philosophy.

     Professor Yegnashankaran teaches courses in the philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, the philosophy of action, the philosophy of biology, and philosophy of science.

Contact information: kyegnash@bard.edu. On leave 2013-2014.

For more information visit this site: http://www.kritikayegnashankaran.com/

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Affiliated Faculty

Thomas Bartscherer
Assistant Professor of Humanities; Director, Language and Thinking Program

Thomas Bartscherer

Thomas Bartscherer has studied at the University of Pennsylvania (B.A. English & Comparative Literature) and the University of Chicago (M.A., PhD candidate, Committee on Social Thought) and has held research fellowships at the École Normale Supérieure (Paris), the University of Heidelberg, and the LMU in Munich. Areas of specialization include aesthetics and moral psychology, Plato, Nietzsche, and philosophical approaches to tragedy. Areas of competence include ancient Greek and 19th century German philosophy, the philosophy of technology, and the philosophy of education. Bartscherer is co-editor of Erotikon: Essays on Eros Ancient and Modern (University of Chicago Press) with Shadi Bartsch and Switching Codes (forthcoming, University of Chicago Press) with Roderick Coover. He has published and lectured in both American and European venues on a wide range of topics in philosophy, literature, and contemporary culture. He has received fellowships from the DAAD, and the Woodrow Wilson, Nef, and Earhart foundations and is currently a research associate on the Équipe Nietzsche at the Institut des Textes et Manuscrits Modernes, Paris. Bartscherer has taught previously at the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago. Assistant Professor of Humanities; Director, Language and Thinking Program.

     Professor Bartscherer has recently taught courses on Socrates and on Euripides & Nietzsche.

Contact information: bart@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7142. 
Hegeman 303.


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Roger Berkowitz
Associate Professor of Political Studies and Human Rights

Roger Berkowitz

Ph.D. University of California-Berkeley; J.D., University of California-Berkeley.  Academic Director of the Hannah Arendt Center for Ethical and Political Thinking here at Bard College. His essays have appeared in The Journal of Politics, Philosophy and Literature, the Journal of Law, Culture and Humanities, New Nietzsche Studies, Theoretical Inquiries in Law, Rechtshistorisches Journal, The Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities, The Cardozo Law Review, Rechtsgeschichte, and many other publications. (2005– ) Associate Professor of Political Studies and Human Rights; Academic Director, Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities.

     Professor Berkowitz teaches political theory, legal thought, and human rights.

Contact information: berkowitz@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7413
Arendt Center 101.

An interview with Roger Berkowitz: Harpers Magazine on Hannah
Arendt:
http://www.harpers.org/archive/2009/12/hbc-90006176


For more information visit this site: http://www.vernunft.org/

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James Brudvig
Vice President for Administration

James Brudvig

     Professor Brudvig teaches a course on informal logic. 

Contact information: brudvig@bard.edu. Phone ext. 7424.
Ludlow first floor.



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Alan Sussman
Visiting Associate Professor of Philosophy

Alan Sussman

B.A.,M.A., University of Chicago; J.D., L.L.M., New York University School of Law. Lawyer in private practice, specializing in civil rights. Coauthor, The Rights of Parents and Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect: Guidelines for Legislation. Author, The Rights of Young People. Other publications include articles in New York University Law Review, Criminal Law Bulletin, Family Law Quarterly, Seton Hall Law Review, Politics & Culture, and others. (1999– ) Visiting Associate Professor of Philosophy.

     Professor Sussman teaches courses in the philosophy of law, ethics, and political philosophy.

Contact information: alansussman@hotmail.com. Phone ext. 7270 (fall). 
Aspinwall 110 (fall).


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Visiting Faculty

Ruth Zisman
Visiting Instructor in Humanities and Faculty Advisor to the Debate Team.

Ruth Zisman

B.A. (Philosophy and Literature), Vassar College; M.A. (Humanities and Social Thought), New York University; Ph.D. Candidate (German Studies), New York University. Areas of specialization include German philosophy from Kant to the present (specifically Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Freud), political philosophy, feminist thought, psychoanalysis, contemporary questions in theory, and the relationship between philosophy and literature. Has taught at NYU and various debate workshops and institutes throughout the US and Europe, held research fellowships in Berlin and Weimar, Germany, and presented at academic conferences at Cornell, Yale, and the University of Zurich. Was the recipient of NYU’s 2010 “Outstanding Teaching Award.” (2011– ) Visiting Instructor in Humanities and Faculty Advisor to the Debate Team.

      Professor Zisman teaches courses in continental philosophy and political philosophy.

Contact information: zisman@bard.edu Phone ext. 4512.
Hegeman 301.


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